When

Thursday August 4, 2011 from 7:00 pm
Lecture starts at 7:30 sharp 
(Get to know the Archives starts at 6:30 pm.)  

Add to my calendar 

 

Where

City of Toronto Archives 
255 Spadina Road
Toronto, ON M5R 2V3
 
(one block from Dupont subway station) 

 
Driving Directions 

 

The Toronto History Lecture is organized and supported by an informal group of friends and associates of Paul McGrath and the following organizations:
City of Toronto Archives
Ontario Genealogical Society
Ancestry.ca
To make a tax-deductible donation to support future lectures, send a cheque (payable to the Ontario Genealogical Society and marked "Toronto History Lectures") to:
Ontario Genealogical Society
40 Orchard View Blvd., Suite 102
Toronto, ON  M4R 1B9

Contact

The Toronto History Lecture 
paulmcgrathlecture@gmail.com 
416-392-0558 (Jessica Algie) 

 

 The 2011 Toronto History Lecture in memory of Paul McGrath

Rebel Remembered:
The Legacy of William Lyon Mackenzie,
150 Years After His Death 

William Lyon Mackenzie

Last December, Toronto’s newly elected mayor ended his inaugural acceptance speech with a reference to his predecessor, Toronto’s first mayor:

William Lyon Mackenzie was a bit of a rebel. He was a colorful character who was not accepted by the establishment because he fought against privilege and FOR the little guy.

Mackenzie would have been delighted, not only to be invoked, but so favourably. It was not always so. During his life, and for the century and a half since his death, Mackenzie was a figure of controversy – yet those who idolize him and those who demonize him have misunderstood him.

Today Mackenzie is the only 19th-century mayor whose name anyone recognizes. What, other than his name, is worth remembering?

Speaker: Chris Raible is writer and historian whose primary research interest is Upper Canadian history with a special focus on the career of William Lyon Mackenzie. His four books include two on Mackenzie—Muddy York Mud and A Colonial Advocate—one on the Canadian printing history—The Power of the Press—and one on carved and inscribed wooden boxes made by 1837 Rebellion prisoners—From Hands Now Striving to be Free. His articles and reviews appear regularly in the York Pioneer, Canada’s History (formerly The Beaver), Ontario History and other heritage publications.

 SORRY, BUT THE 2011 LECTURE IS NOW FULLY BOOKED.
WANT TO BE NOTIFIED ABOUT THE NEXT TORONTO HISTORY LECTURE?
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Registration is closed.

Get to know the City of Toronto Archives

Curious about when your home was built? Someone lived there before you—who were they? What was your neighbourhood like?

JOIN US FOR REFRESHMENTS BEFORE THE LECTURE FROM 6:30 TO 7:30 TO DISCOVER MORE ABOUT WHAT THE GREAT COLLECTION AT THE CITY OF TORONTO ARCHIVES HAS TO OFFER.

We have more than 1.2 million photographs and over 3,000 maps. Explore the letter and diaries of local families or search Toronto's past through our government collection. We also have records from the townships, villages and boroughs that make up Toronto today. Start your research at toronto.ca/archives.

The Archives is open and accessible for everyone. Visit us during the week from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm. We are also open Saturdays from October to April.

Paul James McGrath, 1959–2008
Paul McGrath came naturally to researching, writing and speaking about Toronto history. After all, he was a 6th-generation Torontonian who loved living within the original Town of York. A local and family historian for more than 30 years, Paul was at the time of his sudden death in 2008 both the Chair of the Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society and staff genealogist for the TV series Ancestors in the Attic.

On TV Paul was a compelling screen presence. At genealogy conferences he was a popular speaker renowned for spectacular PowerPoint presentations. His website, OntarioRoots.com, used state-of-the-art database technology to store and retrieve genealogical information. Yet there was a less glamorous aspect of communication that was equally valued by Paul, who wore hearing aids due to an illness. Not only did he learn American Sign Language, but also Braille so that he could communicate with both deaf and blind communities. He contributed to a section of our Constitution that deals with the rights of the disabled.

The friends of this accomplished historian and communicator hope that the Toronto History Lecture in memory of Paul McGrath will be as interesting, engaging and eclectic as if he himself were delivering it.