Sponsored by 

 

 Bruce G. Cochener Foundation      

When

Saturday, October 6, 2018 from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM CDT
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Where

WSU Eugene M. Hughes Metropolitan Complex 
5015 East 29th St N
Wichita, KS 67220
 

 
Driving Directions 

Contact

 Ruth Ann Koepsel           316.648.9654                 rakoepsel@gmail.com

                                              

This special event brings 6 inspiring authors to Wichita to host small group sessions where they will share stories, answer questions, and autograph books. The day begins with a continental breakfast and a speaker followed by the opportunity to attend two break-out sessions, enjoy a delicious lunch, and hear another inspiring author. Scattered throughout the day is an opportunity to purchase the authors’ books and obtain autographs. 

Cost:   $90 which covers continental Breakfast, full lunch and the events of the day.

AGENDA

8:00 – Check-in/Authors' Books for Sale/Pre-ordered books available for pick-up

Raffle Basket tickets available for purchase  ($2 each/Seven for $10)

8:00 - 9:00 - Continental Breakfast 

9:00 – 9:50 - Welcome, Introduction of Authors and Speaker: Delia Owens

9:55 – 10:45 – 1st Break-Out Session

10:50 – 11:40 – 2nd Break-Out Session

11:45 – 12:15 - Book Sales/Author Signings

12:15 - 1:30 - Lunch/Raffle and Speaker: Sarah Smarsh

1:40 - 2:25 - Author Panel/Audience Q&A/Raffle

2:30 – 3:00 - Book Sales/Author Signings

Registration is limited. To assure your reservation register at the link below.

Reservation deadline: October 1st

No reservations at the door.

                Authors participating in Day of Authors

                                          Sarah Smarsh “was born a fifth generation Kansas wheat farmer on her paternal side and [she is] the product of generations of teen mothers on her maternal side.” As a journalist, Smarsh has written about “class, politics, and public policy for The Guardian, VQR, NewYorker.com, Harpers.org, and The Texas Observer.” (Scribner).  In her first book, Heartland:  A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth, on sale Sept. 18, Smarsh explores class and poverty through an account of her low-income, rural Kansas-based extended family in an affecting memoir.” (Kirkus Review).  [In Heartland, Smarsh], “tough-minded and rough-hewn, draws us into the real lives of her family, barely making it out there on the American plains.” (George Hodgman, author of Bettyville).  Smarsh is currently a fellow at Harvard University’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics, and Public Policy.

                                      

Jenna Blum is the author of the award-winning Those Who Save Us, “a hair-raising debut,” and of The Stormchasers (Publishers Weekly).  In her new novel, The Lost Family, Blum “returns with an emotionally riveting family saga about the reverberations of World War II.” (HarperCollins).  Peter, a widower, whose wife and daughters, were killed in the Holocaust, resettles in postwar Manhattan.  There, he works as a chef and ultimately opens an upscale restaurant, Masha’s, named for his beloved wife.  Peter is unable or perhaps unwilling to break through his survivor’s guilt until he crafts a new, yet still insular life with June, a beautiful model, and their daughter Elsbeth.  The damaging effects of trauma on a second and even a third generation unfold in the remaining two-thirds of the novel.  The Lost Family “offers a lesson in honesty, regardless of how difficult the truth may be.” (Library Journal).   “An unsentimental, richly detailed study of loss and its legacy.”  (Kirkus Reviews).

     

Lou Berney author of three previous crime novels, including the triple award-winning The Long and Faraway Gone, has written a fourth noir thriller, November Road, to be published October 9.   Berney’s newest book follows two characters who meet by chance on a cross-country run.  Frank “knows too much about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy,” and Charlotte knows that she and her two daughters are no longer safe with her alcoholic husband (HarperCollins).  “Lou Berney takes us on the ride of a lifetime as two people collide, dangerously, with history in 1963 America.” (Megan Abbott, Edgar winning crime writer).  While Frank is chased by a mob lieutenant, Charlotte, driven by dreams for a better life, is chased by guilt.  November Road “is a staggeringly brilliant book.”  (Don Winslow, author of The Force). 

                     

Caroline Fraser received the 2017 National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography   and the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography for Prairie Fires:  The American Dreams of Laura Ingalls Wilder.  Also named one of the best books of 2017 by The New York Times, Boston Globe, and Sunday Times (U.K.). “Fraser’s gripping account is much more than a biography.” (Sunday Times.). “Extensively researched, Prairie Fires reflects Fraser’s deep knowledge of westward expansion, and captures the full arc of Wilder’s life in three acts:  poverty, struggle, and reinvention.” (Pulitzer Prize citation).   Prairie Fires is “the first comprehensive historical biography of the beloved author of the Little House on the Prairie books.” (macmillan).  Fraser’s writing, her analysis of the myth of the19th Century American West and of Wilder’s role in shaping that myth is “as effective at racking nerves as it is at provoking thought.” (The New York Times Book Review).

                       

Delia Owens zoologist, is the co-author of three bestselling, award-winning nonfiction books about her life as a wildlife scientist in Africa.  In her fiction debut, Where the Crawdads Sing, “Owens weaves a compelling tale of a forgotten girl in the coastal marshes of North Carolina.” (Christopher Scotton, author of The Secret Wisdom of the Earth).  Crawdads is “an exquisite ode to the natural world, a heartbreaking coming-of-age story, and a surprising tale of possible murder.” (G.P. Putnam’s Sons).  The marsh girl, Kya, “makes for an unforgettable heroine.”  (Publishers Weekly).   Where the Crawdads Sing, to be released August 14, has  been described by early reviewers as evocative, luminous, lush, lyrical, and stunning.”  

                      

Peter Geye has written three award-winning novels. Safe from the Sea, The Lighthouse Road, and Wintering, all set in the northern wilderness region of Minnesota. "Geye's writing is a paean to the complexity and ultimate triumph of the human spirit that is often as much at odds with itself as it is against the forces of nature." (Southwest Journal). A reading of Wintering, in particular, moved us to invite Geye to participate in our first ALW Day of Authors. Reviewers' accoldates— "epic in scope and deeply personal," "a triumph," "unforgettable characters, powerful landscapes, and even more powerful emotions," "a novel for the ages"— are not overstated. Booklist calls Wintering's Harry Eide, his son Gus, and Harry's friend, Berit Lovig, "immaculately conceived characters," while Kirkus Reviews claims "Geye's narrative takes us deep into both human and natural wilderness." Peter Geye was born and raised in Minneapolis, where he still lives.

has written three award-winning novels.  Safe from the Sea, The Lighthouse Road, and Wintering are all set in the northern wilderness region of Minnesota.  “Geye’s writing is a paean to the complexity and ultimate triumph of the human spirit that is often as much at odds with itself as it is against the forces of nature.” (Southwest Journal).  A reading of Wintering, in particular, moved us to invite Geye to participate in our first ALW Day of Authors.  Reviewers’ accolades—“epic in scope and deeply personal,” “a triumph,” “unforgettable characters, powerful landscapes, and even more powerful emotions,” “a novel for the ages”—are not overstated.   Booklist calls Wintering’s Harry Eide, his son Gus, and Harry’s friend, Berit Lovig, “immaculately conceived characters,” while Kirkus Reviews claims “Geye’s narrative takes us deep into both human and natural wilderness.”  Peter Geye was born and raised in Minneapolis, where he still lives.

Visit Watermark Books to pre-order books for authors to sign.

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Your attendance benefits the philanthropic programs of the Assistance League (ALW), a national nonprofit with a vision to empower volunteers to make lasting change through community-based philanthropic programs.  The ALW receives no United Way funds, have no paid staff, and all funds remain in Wichita.  Locally, the Assistance League supports four programs:  Operation School Bell, Scholarships, Assault Survivor Kits and Bear Hugs. 

 Those interested in more information on the services provided, or to donate or become involved with the Assistance League of Wichita, call 316-687-6107 or visit https://www.assistanceleague.org/wichita/.