When

Wednesday, May 22, 2019 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM EDT
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Registration & Continental Breakfast begins at 8:30.

Where

CPRI, Zarfas Hall 
600 Sanatorium Road
London, ON N6H 3W7
 

 
Driving Directions 

Registration Fees

$55 Early Bird (register before March 22)
$65 Standard Rate (register after March 22)
$45 Group Rate (2+ participants)
$25 Student Rate (must register offline/provide copy of student ID)  Download the form here, return via email along with a copy of your student ID

Contact

Education & Learning Services, CPRI 
CPRI Education 
519-858-2774 x5552 
cpri.educate@ontario.ca 

This event is held in partnership with

 

Disclaimer

The views and opinions expressed by presenters do not necessarily state or reflect those of MCCSS/CPRI. MCCSS/CPRI does not promote, endorse, or recommend any specific products, processes, or services. 
 

FASD and the Criminal Justice System: What Can We Do?

Presented by Kenna Dalrymple LLB, Dr. Kim Harris PhD C Psych, Dr. Kaitlyn McLachlan PhD C Psych, Dr. Clare Mitchell MD FRCPC 

Adolescents and adults with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) are overrepresented in the criminal justice system, yet evidence remains limited regarding the best approaches for addressing this problem. Key identified needs include further education for professionals working in criminal justice contexts, and ensuring that policy shifts are evidence-informed.

Through a series of presentations, an interdisciplinary panel, and round table discussions, this interactive event will:

  • highlight the diagnostic process for FASD and key clinical characteristics that may lead to problems with the law;
  • describe how to identify individuals with FASD within the criminal justice system;
  • summarize the empirical data available including a review of the prevalence of FASD in criminal justice contexts, justice-based screening challenges, and evidence from a research and practice perspective related to adverse outcomes, unique risks, as well as needs and responsivity factors in adolescents and adults with FASD in the criminal justice context;
  • discuss how to improve sharing of relevant information regarding FASD across disciplines within and outside the justice system.

Objectives

Recognize key clinical characteristics that place individuals with FASD at risk of problems with the law

  1. Gain knowledge in screening and identifying individuals with FASD within the criminal justice system at various levels
  2. Recognize the state of the science concerning adolescents and adults with FASD in the criminal justice system
  3. Summarize key challenges inherent in undertaking research on FASD in criminal justice contexts
  4. Gain strategies to improve the sharing of information regarding FASD across disciplines
  5. Obtain a broad perspective on the practical issues related to FASD and the justice system through discussion with colleagues from a variety of disciplines
  6. Discuss policies related to FASD and the justice system and realize the need for research in this area to inform change. 
Target Audience:  Family Physicians, Paediatricians, Psychiatrists, Social workers, Probation officers, Child and Youth Workers, Developmental Service Workers, Psychologists, Psychometrists, Lawyers, Judges, Police officers, Educators.

About The Presenters

 

 

Kenna Dalrymple graduated from Dalhousie Law School in 1988 and was called to the Bar in Ontario in 1990. Kenna was part of the team responsible for developing the London Adult Therapeutic Court, London Youth Therapeutic Court and the London Drug Treatment Court.

Dr. Kaitlyn McLachlan is an Assistant Professor in Psychology and the University of Guelph and a registered clinical and forensic psychologist in the province of Ontario. 

Dr. Kimberly Harris is a registered clinical and forensic psychologist in the province of Ontario and is the Assistant Executive Director at the London Family Court Clinic. 

Dr. Clare Mitchell is an Associate Professor at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University in London, Ontario. She is the Head of the Division of Developmental and Behavioural Paediatrics.