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When

Thursday, May 2, 2019 from 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM EDT
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Where

Hart Senate Office Building
120 Constitution Ave NE
Room 902
Washington, DC 20002
 

 
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Contact

Leah Davenport
C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State 
 
lvirbits@gmu.edu
 

The Constitution's First Branch:Rediscovering the Legislative Power

General registration is now closed. Please reach out to Leah Davenport at lvirbits@gmu.edu if you would like to attend or have any questions.

Congress is the Constitution’s first branch of our government, but Congress no longer plays the lead role in formulating federal law and policy. How has Congress’s role in governance changed in recent decades? Why has it changed? And what can be done to restore Congress to its proper place at the center of our constitutional system?

 On May 2, the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State will host a conference to discuss these questions, with an array of expert scholars and practitioners.

The event is free for all to attend, and the agenda is available below. We hope you will join us. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agenda

8:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. - Registration and Breakfast 

9:00 a.m. - 10:25 a.m.Panel 1: The Constitution’s First Branch: Rediscovering the Legislative Power

Jonathan H. Adler, Director, Center for Business Law and Regulation and Johan Verheij Memorial Professor of Law, Case Western Reserve University School of Law

Sarah A. Binder, Professor of Political Science, George Washington University, and Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, Brookings Institution  

Christopher J. Walker, Associate Professor of Law, Moritz College of Law, The Ohio State University; and Director, The Moritz Washington, D.C. Summer Program

Philip A. Wallach, Senior Fellow, R Street Institute

Moderator: Adam White, Executive Director, The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State and Assistant Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University 

10:25 a.m. - 10:40 a.m. - Break 

10:40 a.m. - 11:55 a.m. - Panel 2: How Does Central Party Control in Congress Affect the Legislative Process?

Christopher J. Barkley, Policy Director, Senator Mitt Romney

Frances E. Lee, Professor of Government and Politics, University of Maryland

James I. Wallner, Senior Fellow, R Street Institute

Moderator: Andrew Kloster, Deputy Director, The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State

11:55 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. - Lunch

12:15 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. - Panel 3: Rediscovering Congress’s Institutional “Ambition”

Christopher DeMuth, Distinguished Fellow, Hudson Institute

Yuval Levin, Editor, National Affairs; and Hertog Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center

Matthew Spalding, Associate Vice President and Dean of Educational Programs, Allan P. Kirby Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship, Hillsdale College

Moderator: Adam White, Executive Director, The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State and Assistant Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University

1:30 p.m. - Adjourn


About the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State

The C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State is dedicated to fostering significant legal scholarship on new and timeless questions about the modern administrative state, in order to elevate and improve debates occurring in the courts, in Congress, in the executive branch, and in the broader public.

Since its founding in 2015, initially under the leadership of Professor Neomi Rao and now Professor Adam White, the Gray Center has hosted countless scholars, practitioners, and policymakers to research and debate the constitutional and practical issues of administrative power and discretion.

At George Mason University’s Antonin Scalia Law School, across the Potomac River from our nation’s capital, the Gray Center serves as a bridge between the work of academia and the work of courts, Congress, the executive branch, and private practitioners. Learn more at administrativestate.gmu.edu.